Photo Hunt #74; Dirty

My genealogical interests lead me into many cemeteries, new and old.

I am always distressed to find graves which have been forgotten. Broken, stained and covered in the detritus of even a well-maintained graveyard.

John Fouracre, who died a hundred years ago, was not one of my ancestors, although I know of several of his descendants. I wonder if any of those descendants is interested in their family history. Or if it will be another generation or two before that curiousity strikes a Fouracre. Will there still be a gravestone to find?

All I can do is pass by, and in passing, spare a thought for one of the men who helped, in a small way, to shape a part of the country in which I live. Ann Fouracre who had children, kept house and helped civilise the land, died twenty seven years earlier. A daughter died in the same year as her father. Perhaps there was an unremarked epidemic of some now-not-fatal disease.

For now they are remembered only by a dirty and neglected memorial.

dirty.jpg

28 responses to “Photo Hunt #74; Dirty

  1. I sometimes walk through the small cemetery near our house and read the headstones… there’s something interesting about it!

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  2. Sehr geEhrter Aerchis

    ScHockingLy well done

    Remembered by a broken gravestone … but also (thanks to den AerChie) by us

    Vielen Dank, nochmals
    [Many thanks, yet again]

    Yr obedt servant etc

    G Eagle

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  3. I hope his descendants take notice soon…before the headstone’s gone!

    happy hunting!

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  4. A poignant post. For some reason the aging gravestone is beautiful to me but I understand how you feel about the neglect.

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  5. Interesting image. I’ve not done any research in a while, but I’ve done my share of exploring cemeteries.

    Have a great weekend!

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  6. This is a beautiful and wonderful tribute. I love old gravestones and often wonder about the families that have survived those they serve as a memorial for. Beautifully done.

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  7. Cemeteries are such fascinating places. Great shot!

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  8. It’s kinda sad but rather human to see such neglect. Nice photo.

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  9. Forgotten after so many years. 100 years, the headstone should be preserved in memory of the descendants’ ancestor.

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  10. wow–what a fascinating shot!! great find.

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  11. nice take on this week’s theme. i hope his descendants would still remember his grave and clean it, every year we go to my dad’s grave and give it a clean and stay there for a while..

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  12. I don’t think it’s neglect but all the years that have passed. Who’s to care for these headstones if all family members have passed, or don’t know or remember where it is at. Who will take care of our headstones in 100 years. It is a great memorial to this particular person. Great photo and have a good weekend.

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  13. Love the photo – it is really beautiful even though it is dirty. It speaks to me of our life here on earth before we reach the beautiful shore.

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  14. A little sad but a great photo for this week’s theme. Have a great weekend.

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  15. What a great choice for the week’s theme. Have a great weekend.

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  16. it’s kinda sad to see this but nevertheless, great choice for the theme.

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  17. What a nice little tribute to this family. 🙂

    Happy Weekend.

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  18. How very true, it is so sad to see untended graves. These days I suppose there is some inevitability when you consider how mobile any population is. I often walk through graveyards and wonder about the stories people could tell.

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  19. it’s a pity indeed to see graves in this predicament.

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  20. Beautiful photo and post. Who knows what happened to the descendants. They may have all died out or moved away.

    My Photo Hunt this week.

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  21. Thank you everyone. Actually, that headstone is 127 years old because it was first made for the wife, Ann. What happened to the descendants is interesting – 6 children, one of whom died in infancy. One daughter married and has descendants, but it seems no one else did. The daughter who is mentioned in the broken part of the headstone was Leah who was murdered. I must find out more! History is fascinating.

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  22. Wonderful post. Gravestones are incredible stories and messages to our past. I encourage others to visit cemeteries and to learn the histories surrounding some of those headstones. It is amazing.

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  23. I love wandering around old graveyards … the stories the gravestones could tell.

    Thanks for stopping by mine 🙂

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  24. Love your photo and your post.

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  25. It’s truly a shame and a pity to find his grave so dirty…
    Send a link of your post to your local newspaper…

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  26. Good entry and interesting story. . . I agree that there may be no descendants left to care for gravesites. I think it becomes the communities responsibility then. I do not live close to those who have died in my fmaily and don’t have opportunities to tend to their gravesites either. The world is much more mobile now. I used to love to take paper and rub the headstones with crayon on the paper to get the words from the stones. Some were fascinating.Come and see mine.

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  27. Lovely post for a “dirty” subject. Thank you for stopping by Pollywog Creek yesterday. I’m sorry it took me to so long to cross the pond to your place! Blessings!

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