Talk Like An Egyptian

On this blog I do not often record the day to day minutia of my rather dull life. Events and visual experiences around me are far more interesting.

Yesterday was an exception. Although, again, it was based mainly on some rather special visual experiences.

Years ago I helped daughter with a school assignment on the Sumer civilisation and ever since she has had an interest in ancient civilisations.

Daughter and family came up to Perth last night for a martial arts competition (note to self :- don’t upset daughter or grandchildren) and stayed up overnight so they could take two children and an aged parent to the State Art Gallery.

The Art Gallery is hosting an exhibition on loan from the Louvre. An exhibition of ancient Egyptian Funerary Art.

Hundreds of real, ancient man-made objects. Like these 209 Ushabti. I won’t talk about the rip-off prices on the memorabilia tables.

Naturally she had to introduce her children to very old stuff. And I was able to be there and share their wonder. It was also interesting to see daughter doing the early explanations with enthusiasm and skill. A genuine natural and unspoiled teacher with a subject with which she is still fascinated.

I was also able to wonder at a seven year old grandson who insisted on reading the labels and stories out loud. Getting most of the long words right. Even the Egyptian ones. You try pronouncing “Nephthys”, “Qebehswenuef” or “Djedkhonsouiouefankh”.

I am a very impressed grandfather.

3 Responses

  1. [...] default@goarticles.com (Lyca Shan) wrote an interesting post today onHere’s a quick excerptDaughter and family came up to Perth last night for a martial arts competition (note to self :-… [...]

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  2. cool. There’s a display of ancient Egyptian artifacts at our museum of art and history right now. I’m DYING to go… I hope it’s still open after the first of the month when I get my social security check. We missed the Tut display in LA when we were there, the kids haven’t seen this stuff yet.

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  3. Dorid, It is one thing to read about these things in books and to see two-dimensional photographs, but to actually SEE these ancient works is a totally different experience. Those two grandkids will never forget seeing this exhibition and it will enrich their lives forever.

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